Reflection #3: “Someone Else’s Star”

To quote Ms. Polack’s checklist for the week, one of my challenges was to:

Find two photos from the Daily Create Photography assignments, embed them into a blog post, and write a story that connects what happens in the first photo to the second one. Make it like a story sandwich, with your writing as the arc that connects the two images.

In this case, I went with a parody of Nash Bozard’s weekly round-up, of what he’s been known to call “the absolute best, of the absolute worst.” As it happens, this year marked the fifteenth anniversary of Nash’s weekly podcast, Radio Dead Air, first airing in the summer of 2000. The flagship segment of the show, and the reason people know of RDA to this day, is a recap of weird news segments from around the world, though a majority of the headlines take place in the United States.

As far as how this particular project was constructed, it all comes down to one phrase: “What you see is what you get.” This is a straightforward send-up of a typical news story found on one of Nash’s news hours. Given how many clichés have popped up over the course of the show’s run, it didn’t take long to create a story that fit Mr. Bozard’s particular brand of comedy.

The two photos I uploaded to the usual site, along with other pictures I added to the story for show, were from Daily Create challenges held earlier this year. One of them involved drawing and editing faces onto car photos, and the other simply requested that participants take their most horrid “selfie,” which is, essentially, a self-portrait made on a camera or smartphone. Since I’m not necessarily taking part in either of those challenges, you can tell that I’m not sending the photos over to either Daily Create site.

When all is said and done here, this was one of my favorite assignments of the semester. As I’ve stated before, I love writing, and tasks like these allow me to really let my creativity run wild. Getting the photos for this assignment was as easy as before, if not easier, and overall, I actually liked the finished product, as minimalistic as it was. It’s this kind of experience, and this justified sense of pride, that has made this class worthwhile, at least from my perspective.

September 11th, 2015 by
css.php
%d bloggers like this: